PR vs. Journalism. World War…not sure, I’ve lost count.

It’s the world’s worst kept secret that PR practitioners and journalists have what can most generously be called a fractious relationship. To any new entrant into the PR industry, it can still come as something of a shock. I have seen people reduced to tears mid sell-in by some particularly rude treatment. In all honesty, the industry probably isn’t for them if that’s the result. You need a thick skin to get by, and you need to acquire it quickly. Having said that, being reduced to tears in your workplace is absolutely not right and no one should feel it’s acceptable to do so.

I’ve been on the receiving end of a few journalist rants and have found the best method for dealing with them can be summed up thus: style it out. It’s going to happen, you’ll learn from it, and next time you allocate a press list you’ll probably give that particular journo a swerve.

Whilst the tear-inducing, apocalyptic journalist rants are thankfully few and far between, they do still happen. And it begs the question, why? I am lucky in my job that, in the main, I deal with journalists who are respectful and rarely give me the rude treatment; and I like to think that I am equally as approachable. I think the problem, like with any relationship, is all about understanding. That is, PRs and journalists seem to rarely understand each other, what each other wants/needs, and what each other can do/deliver.

My biggest tip from a PR point of view to gain that understanding would be research. What interests the journalist you’re about to call? What to they write, what are the angles, what do they tweet about, have you tailored your pitch, are you calling on press day, have you spoken to this journalist before? And the biggest question, is this actually news? This (and more) should be standard protocol before picking up the phone, though anecdotal evidence suggests otherwise.

And if I could suggest for our journo friends a little understanding too? We all have a job to do, and our jobs involve ringing you sometimes. And you never know, it might be useful/interesting/fruitful. I know you get a lot of phone-calls, and so do I, but let’s refrain from outright shoutiness and nastiness, eh?

Can’t we all just get along?!

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How to win at social media with the Clintons

Here’s a post I recently wrote for the Spark blog

You may have seen recently that Hillary Clinton became the latest of the Clinton Clan to join Twitter, following in the footsteps of husband Bill and daughter Chelsea. And whichever PR pro helped Hillary launch her first tentative social footsteps was something of a genius, she may have only tweeted four times (to date), but she’s gone down a storm.

Bill and Chelsea are far more active, as are all their associated profiles which encompass their many charitable and action foundations. The Clintons have built a formidable presence on Twitter, perhaps learning from Barack Obama himself, whose social media practices have been near flawless. As a ‘brand’, the Clintons are impressive – managing to do what many businesses fail to do; build a cohesive, united, ‘joined-up’ presence on social media networks to get that all important message out there.

Social media, as we all know, is here to stay (as are the Clintons). Having a social media ‘presence’ is deemed as an almost necessity for businesses these days – and whether it is the right thing for your business or not (it isn’t always!), there are lessons to be learned from the Clintons if you’re making the jump to social.

So, what tips can companies pick up from the Clinton’s foray into the Twittersphere?

  • Make an entrance – Hillary’s inspired first tweet, a play on the #TextsFromHillary meme was a great start. Retweeted 11,042 times so far, that first tweet itself generated a whole lot of headlines and goodwill.
  • Have a sense of humour – Well done Hillary, referencing your own meme and taking‘selfies’ with your child; clever, wry and in the best of humour.
  • Choose your time wisely – Do not, under any circumstances, try to gain capital or make jokes out of tragic events (I can’t believe that even needs to be said, but sadly it does).
  • Don’t forget your profile – The 140 characters under you name is your first chance to draw the user in. Hillary’s is excellent, and that clever ‘TBD…’ ending hasn’t put those 2016 rumours to bed.
  • Be active – Now Hillary is letting the side down here a bit, but Bill and Chelsea are regular tweeters; businesses with inactive streams or infrequent updates are not engaging in the conversation which will deliver them customers.
  • Build your brand – Chelsea Clinton does this very well, her Twitter profile page has the Twitter handles of all her other associated accounts listed down the side – a good tip, make it easy for users to find your other connected networks.

Now, the Clintons were starting out with a good deal of reputation and cache already in place – very, very few businesses will have that type of expectation or welcome if they decide to go social. Building a social media following is a slow and involved process, and can’t be done half-heartedly. But whether you decide to make the social leap, or if you already have, why not strive to be like the best?